Plant Propagation

Propagating Lantana, Buddleia, Milkweed, Parsley...

A mixed bag of correspondence from the IBBA Mailing List and Butterfly Family List, copied here in strict date order.

[ Sorry, I couldn't find the post (or posts) that started this thread off! ]


Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 18:12:11 +0100
From: "Bernie Farrell" <Bernie.Farrell@btinternet.com>
Subject: Propagating lantana

Lantana roots very easily from cuttings which you can just place in moist compost and keep from drying out.

Best wishes
Bernie F.

Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 07:26:47 +0100
From: "Bernie Farrell" <Bernie.Farrell@btinternet.com>
Subject: Re: Propagating lantana

Buddlea is even easier to propagate.It can be done in the same way as lantana or you can just plant some short branches in the soil in March.If you keep this soil moist,most of them will develop into plants which can be transplanted later.

"air layering" is a method which works well with buddlea.The stem of a growing branch is partly cut and a little packet is made around this with polythene.Some damp compost is placed in this packet and the whole packet is sealed with insulating tape.If this is done in late Spring,you should be able to cut the new rooted plant of it's parent in a few months.

Best wishes
Bernie F.

Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 09:10:18 -0400
From: "Kay Tyre" <ktyre@isgroup.net>
Subject: Lantana

Hello All:

Well now! Finally something, I can tell you about! Rooting lantana is quite easy. A mist bed will do the trick. Also, our long hot summer days that we have here in Florida are a must. I have noticed in the winter success is not as great but, can be accomplished if you are willing to turn up the heat and provide supplemental lighting.

When I take my cuttings, I leave a set of leaves and, then, I cut the next set off. I then cut the leaves that I left on the cutting in half to help reduce transpiration. A little rooting hormone is good. Place in full sun in a mist bed if possible. On cloudy days, you should only need to mist once an hour to every couple of hours, depending on the humidity. On a sunny day, I mist as often as every 5 min. depending on the wind, heat, and other elements.

Lantana should root within 21 days if all the elements are correct. I would not try to take it off the mist bed before 21 days (unless you see roots coming out of the bottom of the container) because, lantana will fool you as to whether it is "ready" or not. I have taken as many as 200 flats out of the mist house only to have to put them back an hour later. So, leave them 21 days. Also, you can purchase timers for intermittent misting quite reasonably. Mine came from rainbird for around $99.

We're Rooting for YOU!~

Kay Tyre, Owner/Operator
Lake City Bamboo and Ornamentals
(386)755-6102
ktyre@isgroup.net

Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 09:07:20 -0500
From: "Linda Rogers" <llrogers@airmail.net>
Subject: Re: Lantana

Thank you Kaye!! Great help with the lantana rooting. As busy as I am (I guess I could work until 2 a.m. instead of midnight!!) I just loved being able to order from you and the Lantana flats were beautiful when they got here. Your price was so reasonable. I have a flower bed that's 3' X 20' and it is now covered with Lantana that grew from the littles you sent just awhile back. That and two large, hanging planters that have Lantana just overflowing the sides. Thanks for providing such nice plant products for us all!!

Linda Rogers
www.butterflyboutique.net
www.timshellfarm.com
www.swallowtailfarms.com
www.butterflybreeders.org

Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 11:38:05 -0400
From: thebutterflybox@juno.com
Subject: parsley and problems!

I have been watching postings about lantana and thought maybe someone could give me some pointers for parsley. I am having the HARDEST time with this little herb! I am transplanting and they are in full sun and they grow very very VERY slowly and turn yellow on edges, some are dying. What do I need to do for parsley to thrive?

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

THANKS
Jenn

Date: Thu, 01 Aug 2002 02:38:40 +0000
From: amyatwood@attbi.com
Subject: milkweed propagation

Hi All;

Does anyone have a good, fast way to propagate milkweed? Wish it was as easy as Lantana and Buddleah appear to be (definitely trying those ideas-thanks!) I have tried dipping the roots in rooting hormone and planting them in moist soil, but to my surprise, that did not work! They rotted and died instead of rooting. I planted some stalks that I cut for the Monarchs out in a garden in my yard, and they look dead, but will they come up next year? (I'm in NH) I guess you know you're a butterfly breeder when you try so hard to grow all these 'weeds' that most people try to eradicate! I've also tried just rooting them in water and planting them after a few weeks-nothing seems to be working. I have a lot of A. syriaca around that I can cut each day, but it would be great to have some more growing in my gardens. My A. currisavica is growing, but very slowly. Even with the Hasta Gro recipe! :(

Thanks for any help!

Amy Atwood
Avalon Acres Butterfly Farm
Durham, NH

Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 21:27:56 -0600
From: "ButterflyBouquets(tm)" <butterfly@butterflybouquets.com>
Subject: Re: parsley and problems!

Parsley doesn't always transplant well. It prefers to be direct seeded. It also prefers the cooler weather of spring and fall. Seeds germinate more uniformly if scarified and even then, they germinate slowly. It does grow slowly before it finally takes off. I haven't found a way to hurry it up - maybe someone else has? I've had luck allowing it to reseed and do its own thing (its biennial). Second year parsley is much quicker to grow in the early spring. Yellowing sounds like possible overwatering.

Leigh Ann from CO

Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 23:19:58 -0700
From: "Elise Anderson" <doves2@earthlink.net>
Subject: RE: milkweed propagation

Amy,

I pulled up some wild milkweed from the roots and planted it in soil and fertilized it with fish emulsion. It looked dead right away, but I just kept on watering it.About 2 weeks later and I have shoots growing up from the soil. I'm not even sure what kind of Milkweed it is ( I think its Common Milkweed) but the Monarchs eat it up and are thriving.The place where it is growing gets burned out every year but it is always coming back, so I will try over wintering it in my greenhouse so I get an early start on growth next year.( we get down in the teens in the winter in northern Nevada)This is the only milkweed I have propagated.

Elise
Memories on Wings
N. Nevada

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 11:38:50 +0100
From: "Nigel & Grace" <nigel-grace@ntlworld.com>
Subject: Re: milkweed propagation

Try Tropical Milkweed (A.curassavica) from seed early in the year...it flowers in three months and is very vigorous. Plant inside (In frost areas) in Jan/February and have large plants in April/May plant outside after all risk of frost has gone. This is a surprisingly hardy plant if you cover the roots with straw after the frost knocks it back and in many areas will spring back into growth the following season. Don't bother to try this if you have temps much below -7C (What's that in F?) in the winter. It will even survive our winters in UK if you insulate the roots well.

hope this helps
Nigel

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 11:31:01 +0100
From: "Nigel & Grace" <nigel-grace@ntlworld.com>
Subject: Re: parsley and problems!

Hi Jenn,

Why not plant some fennel or Rue, Black Swallowtails love both these plants and they are easier than Parsley. Or even just plant some Carrots from you local supermarket....they love the tops, and they grow quick...hope this helps.

Nigel

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 07:32:39 -0400
From: "Lili Pintea-Reed" <pinteareed@madbbs.com>
Subject: Re: parsley and problems!

Parsely will germinate faster if you soak the seeds overnight before direct sowing.

Lili

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 08:21:40 -0400
From: "Kay Tyre" <ktyre@isgroup.net>
Subject: Re: parsley and problems!

Jenn:

Be careful of over-watering. I just had a batch to turn yellow and then it proceeded to rot. Also, the ph of your water can affect a plant negatively if it is not in the correct range. I try to keep mine around 6.2-4 but, some plants like more acidity and some like more alkaline conditions. The correct range is usually fairly easy to look up on the net. There is a company called Frostproof.com. They have ph pens as well as Total Dissolved Solid pens at very reasonable prices. In fact, I have to go now an order a new electrode for my pen so, I'm out of here.

We're Rooting for YOU!~

Kay Tyre, Owner/Operator
Lake City Bamboo and Ornamentals
(386)755-6102
ktyre@isgroup.net

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 08:44:39 -0400
From: "Kay Tyre" <ktyre@isgroup.net>
Subject: Milkweed Propogation

Amy:

I don't know if you read my post on rooting Lantana but, I use the same method for A. curassavica in 50 cell flats and, I have just about 100% success. May I suggest that the medium you used to root them in may hold too much water. You need a very light well drained mixture. Milkweed roots very easily and quickly within 14 days depending on temperature. Also, root in full sun.

I wet my medium up thoroughly before sticking the cuttings. I then place it in my mist house. From then until the rooting process is over, all the cuttings get is a light mist. The duration and frequency depends on the weather at the moment. You have to be diligent with this. If you have your mist set to go off every 5 minutes and suddenly you have an hour or so of clouds, you better get out there and reset the time clock or rot and fungus will start. And if that sun comes out and your mist is not cutting on enough, you will come in to wilted little limp cuttings that may not recover.

Needless to say, my husband keeps me chained to the and only lets me off to check the mist time. He will let me off to answer email an occasional email. I hope this helps you. If not, you've always got me!

We're Rooting for YOU!~

Kay Tyre, Owner/Operator
Lake City Bamboo and Ornamentals
(386)755-6102
ktyre@isgroup.net

Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2002 09:40:13 EDT
From: ShadyOakNursery@aol.com
Subject: Re: milkweed propagation

If anyone is interested in growing tropical milkweed for next year, try an experiment:

Grow some with 3 plants FROM SEED in a pot and trim back to 3-4 inches every time they grow out full and fertilize every time you trim.

Grow some from cuttings the same way and trim back the same way.

Compare ... we never use cuttings now that we've seen the difference in cuttings and seed.

My hunch is that the roots from cuttings have problems keeping up with the abundant growth of the leaves and the stems. With seedlings, the roots are having time to grow before the leaf mass starts. We grow huge full plants and keep about 1,000 in gallon pots.

Has anyone else noticed the difference between those grown from cuttings and those from seed? Those grown from cuttings we DON"T throw away! They ARE good plants, please don't misunderstand me. We just find those grown from seed much better.

Edith

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 10:42:47 -0400
From: "Kay Tyre" <ktyre@isgroup.net>
Subject: Re: milkweed propagation

Hello:

Edith, I am sorry but, I beg to differ on this issue adamantly. I feel that I have been placed in a position that I must defend my business because, I grow my a. curassavica strictly from cuttings. I have grown from both seed and cuttings. The only time I would even consider starting from seed is if I completely ran out of a. curassavica and needed new stock plants so that I could take cuttings.

The cuttings grow much faster partly because, it is started with a stem that is as large around as a pencil and, the root balls are very full before I ship them out. With these very full root balls they are ready to take off and, do so very quickly. With this method, you do not have to wait three months for them to flower. It will be just a matter of days. In fact, the plants are usually flowering (and this is my plugs) by the time I ship them out.

Also, I have been asked to do consulting work with other nurseries because, they were very impressed with the high quality of my gallon plant material and wanted to know my growing method. What I found in the Florida nurseries that I visited, is that most are using a very poor quality of soil that becomes hard and compacted quickly. This will inhibit the ability of the roots to spread even though, the foliage is growing. Of course, this could make one think that the cutting is the problem when it is the soil.

I suggest using a very light, airy, potting mix for growing plugs off. I use a soiless mix called Scott's Metro Mix 366p for professional growers. All you organic folks should like this. It contain no amenities you have to provide it through your organic fertilizers such as Hasta. If you are using a composted mix, make sure you add something to keep it airy and reduce compaction.

I have grown tens of thousands of a. curassavica plants and, since others were asked for their opinion, I felt compelled to respond because, we are talking about my lively-hood here and, I did not want anyone to think that I am supplying them with an inferior product.

I hate controversy and, don't want to start any but, cuttings are my business and, I DO KNOW MY BUSINESS. Also, I have sold many cuttings to breeders on this list. So far, everyone has seemed quite pleased.

We're Rooting for YOU!~

Kay Tyre, Owner/Operator
Lake City Bamboo and Ornamentals
(386)755-6102
ktyre@isgroup.net

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 14:55:14 EDT
From: ShadyOakNursery@aol.com
Subject: Re: milkweed propagation

Kay,

I'm so sorry, I am NOT putting down your business at all. You've grown far more milkweed than I ever have. Please forgive me for anything I may have said that said that would be against your milkweed.

I do know that different methods are suggested for trial on the list and no-one has objected before.

You have had so many customers within IBBA and your name is so hightly recommended within IBBA that I don't think me, a newbie compaired to you, could cause others to doubt the quality of your plants. From all the recommendations I've read on the list, your plants have to be of great quality.

Sorry to have said anything to upset you.

Edith

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 18:29:02 -0400
From: "Kay Tyre" <ktyre@isgroup.net>
Subject: Re: milkweed propagation/oops!

Edith:

Oh my goodness!!!! I was afraid that I might have worded my email wrongly. I know that you are not attacking my business. Please forgive me if my reply sounded as though I felt that way. As far as milkweed propagation goes, we will just have to agree to disagree on this one.

Please do not apologize there is nothing for you to apologize for. By the way, did you know that we live very close to each other? We will have to get together and chat sometime.

Kay

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 14:50:30 -0500
From: "Linda Rogers" <llrogers@airmail.net>
Subject: milkweed propagation

Hi everyone!

Wow, I sure have learned a lot about plant propagation the last couple of days. In fact, Paul is going to put these great posts in the Butterfly Gardening section on the website! Just great stuff here. The best thing about the IBBA is the sharing we do, sharing all of our ideas and methods, and experiences. That is how we grow our businesses and help each other improve what we do. That is what makes us stronger as individuals and as an association.... the sharing.

Of course, personal experience is the greatest teacher of all, if you take what you've read or heard from others and then put it to work in your own situation. We sift through what works for us and put our own twist on things and the result is usually pure magic. With gardening and butterflies both, we are co-creating with Nature, with the Universe and with each other. This is real sacred to me.

I am so thankful for every shred of knowledge, experience and advice I have received from hundreds of posts on this list and from this group. I sometimes have doubts or a different opinion, but know we can always feel free to post what works for us and our experience here. Sometimes we disagree with each other but there is always that underlying respect we have for each other as we "find our way" in this totally new field and industry.

This is a nice time to take pause and thank everyone for everything that has been shared.... for taking time to send an e-mail and for caring enough to share.

Linda

*:-.,_,.-:*'``'*:-.,_,.-:*'``'*:-.,_,.-:*'``'*:-.,_:-.,_,.-:**:-.,_,.

Linda Rogers
www.butterflyboutique.net
www.swallowtailfarms.com
www.timshellfarm.com
www.butterflybreeders.org

Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 17:24:03 -0400
From: "The Monarchy" <monarchy@themonarchy.com>
Subject: Re: milkweed propagation

You are right Linda, your message beat me to what I was going to say--the same thing.

I love how we can all share without fear and knowing that everything will be appreciated.

What may work for one, may not be quite as good or simple as what may work for another, besides the technique of growing/propagating, I am sure other factors come into play as well, perhaps such things as how much attention we can give to the plant.

I myself grow from seed as it has become a winter ritual with me. I'd love to learn more about other methods too.

Thanks to all for their diverse opinions and being willing to open up and share with the rest of us!!! Sometimes there is no 'right' or 'wrong' just 'preferred' or 'not preferred.'

I see that so very often with rearing techniques. Right now I am using two techniques and they both have pros and cons!

Melanie McCarthy


International Butterfly Breeders Association, Inc.


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